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Disability, Society, and the Individual

This guide is for course HSR 240

Models of Disability

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e8/Bush_signs_ADA.jpg/301px-Bush_signs_ADA.jpg

                President George H. W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. [Source: Wikimedia Commons]


Library Resources

 

MODELS & THEORIES OF DISABILITY

PUBLIC POLICY & DISABILITY

ACCESS & ACCESSIBILITY

 

MODELS OF DISABILITY

LAW & DISABILITY RIGHTS

LANGUAGE & TALKING ABOUT DISABILITY

ACCESSIBILITY

 

MODELS OF DISABILITY

PUBLIC POLICY, HEALTH, & DISABILITY

ACCESSIBILITY

LANGUAGE & TALKING ABOUT DISABILITY

THE ADA: RESISTANCE & RESULTS

Online Resources





Sinéad Burke is acutely aware of details that are practically invisible to many of us. At 105 centimeters (or 3' 5") tall, the designed world -- from the height of a lock to the range of available shoe sizes -- often inhibits her ability to do things for herself. Here she tells us what it's like to navigate the world as a little person and asks: "Who are we not designing for?"


 

"I believe that losing my hearing was one of the greatest gifts I've ever received," says Elise Roy. As a disability rights lawyer and design thinker, she knows that being Deaf gives her a unique way of experiencing and reframing the world -- a perspective that could solve some of our largest problems. As she says: "When we design for disability first, you often stumble upon solutions that are better than those when we design for the norm."